Is OG suitable for commodities trading?


#1

Hello,
I am a freelance IT Consultant and my customer has tasked me to evaluate OpenGamma as a position-monitoring tool.
He’s active in gas trading. Customer wants primarily to keep track of Mark-to-Market portfolio and counterparties credit exposure.
Using the Open Source version, is it possible to:

  1. Load price data (Time Series) from external source such as csv
  2. Configure a “custom” (No Bloomberg-identified) security such as Mw/h
  3. OG being primarily a market risk, how to include (simple) credit risk formulas in views ?
  4. Use an Oracle database

Thanks for you response.

Regards,

Lalaina


#2

I’m trying to use OG for bitcoin trading, and I have some thoughts on this.

OG is great technology, and from a technology point of view, the answer is yes. The interfaces to do all of that are there.

However the problem is not the technology ability but rather ease-of-use. OG makes a great “engine” but there isn’t the UI or documentation that makes it easy for small users to use OG.

I’ve been trying to “wrap” OG with enough UI and installation scripts to make it useful for small traders (like me). This is taken a lot of effort, and there is still a lot of work, but you can download my work from http://www.bitquant.com.hk/

My sense is that OG doesn’t have the UI/UX/documentation to be usable for a small trader “out-of-the-box”. But it will eventually get there over the next few months. However, if the trader is willing to spend some money on an IT person who can then contribute the UI/UX improvements to the open source pull, I think OG is the future.

When I look at OG, I feel like I’m playing with a jet engine. It’s really powerful, but it will take a lot of effort to turn that into an airplane that a small shop can use.